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Married: Oct.1898 Plum Orchard, Cumberland Island, Georgia, USA

George Lauder Carnegie
(major events)

Missing
Birth: 1876 Pittsburgh,
Baptism:
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Death: 1921
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Missing
Birth: 9 Jan.1877 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA
Baptism:
Imm.:
Will:
Death: 9 Jan.1942 Kongoni Farm, Kenya
Occ:
Education:

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        m. Oct.1898, Margaret Copley THAW,  b.9 Jan.1877 Pittsburgh, PA, d.9 Jan.1942 Kenya,

       The mansion on Cumberland Island, GA known as Plum Orchard, was built for George and his wife by Lucy Coleman Carnegie in 1898,  in Georgian Revival style.

 


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        Daughter of  William Kendall THAW and Mary COPLEY, and sister of Harry K. THAW.

       In November 1923 Margaret Thaw married Roger Count de Perigny (d.1945). The couple divided their time between a residence in Paris and their farm in Naivasha.

        Margaret Copley Thaw (January 9, 1877 - January 9, 1942) married George Lauder Carnegie (1876-1921), the son of Andrew Carnegies brother Thomas Morrison Carnegie (1844-1886) and his wife Lucy Ackerman Coleman (1847-1916), therefore Andew Carnegies nephew. Their island is now Cumberland Island National Seashore. Settled by this branch of the renowned Carnegie family in 1881, Cumberland Island became a national park in 1972. Along with the wild horses and the ruins of Lucy Carnegies home Dungeness, Cumberland Island is the home of Plum Orchard – a 1898 Georgian Revival mansion built by Lucy Carnegie for her son, George and his wife, Margaret Thaw. This mansion was donated to the National Park Foundation by the Carnegie family in 1971. SFF&HC member Cyrus Elders son George Reuben Elder and family were their friends and frequent visitors. George Carnegies mother gave each of her children a piece of the island and the money to build any type of home they chose if they agreed to live there and raise their children. Of course, living there meant staying there for about 6 months of the year before retiring to their other residences in the Northeast. She retained possession the parcels of land and the homes; controlling them even after her death by not allowing any property to be sold until the youngest of her children passed away... Margaret and her sister Alice were their mothers supporters in the courtroom during the trial of their brother Harry K Thaw. Margaret married (2) Count Roger Perigny on Nov. 1923 in Paris, France. They divided their time between Paris and their farm in Kenya. Margaret Copley Thaw Carnegie died in Kenya at "Kongoni Farm", on her 65th birthday.

 

       Benjamin Thaw was the son of William and Mary C. Thaw of Allegheny, PA. William Thaw’s father John Thaw came to Pittsburgh from Philadelphia in order to establish a branch of the United States Bank of Philadelphia. John Thaw was associated with that institution for the remainder of his life. The Thaws were major stockholders in that enterprise.

       Their son, transportation and banking genius William Thaw was born in Pittsburgh on October 12, 1818 and died in Paris the same year as the Johnstown Flood, on August 17, 1889. He began his business career as a clerk in his father’s bank. Thereafter he worked for McKee, Clark and Co.

       In 1841, William Thaw married Eliza Burd Blair (she died in 1863). In 1842, he and his brother-in-law established themselves in as transporters and owners of steam canal boats. Competition was rife but Clarke and Thaw controlled the Pennsylvania and Ohio line. Their business grew to include canal, portage railroad and steamboat lines. As canal changed to rail transportation, William Thaw engaged in the new technology while divesting himself of the canal business. He was a founder of the Pennsylvania Company, which managed the interests of the Pennsylvania railroad west of the mountains, and was therefore an advisor to and the constant when the transitions occurred by successive Pennsylvania railroad presidents, Thompson, Scott and Roberts. While he concentrated mainly on the financial aspects of the railroad after 1873, William Thaw also helped to establish the first international steamship line, the Red Star Line, to which was later added the American line. He underwrote Prof. Langley’s expiation to Mt Whitney and the building of the Allegheny Observatory for John Brashear. The telescope that his son provided in his memory is considered to be one of the ten best in the world... [http://profilesintime.blogspot.com/2007/02/benjamin-thaw.html]

 


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