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Father: unknown
Mother: unknown
Father: unknown
Mother: unknown



Married: 1693 Coleraine Co., Derry, Ireland

Missing
Birth: 3 May 1645 Kilteny, Coleraine,Co., Londonderry, Ireland
Baptism:
Imm.:
Will:
Death: bef.1738 Londonderry, Derry Co., Ireland
Occ:
Education:


Sara Welsh
(major events)

Missing
Birth: 1646 Ireland
Baptism:
Imm.:
Will:
Death: 1705 Ireland
Occ:
Education:

Family Citations:
Notes:

        One of the signers of the humble address of the Governor, officers, clergy and other gentlemen in the city and garrison of Londonderry, to William and Mary, of the date of July 29, 1689, shortly after the famous siege of that noted stronghold of Protestantism, was James McCormick. Further than that we have little knowledge of him, except that he was the ancestor of the family of whom we have this record. 

       Based on the ages of his children, I estimate that James McCormick was born in about the 1650s and in Londonderry, Ulster, Northern Ireland.  His wife was Sarah Welsh. He brought his family to America in about 1730 or so and settled in what is now Dauphin County, Pennsylvania.  Among perhaps other children, he had the following children:  (above)

[http://www.billputman.com/mccormick.pdf]

 

       He is mentioned in accounts of siege of Londonderry in 1689. Londonderry was the chief stronghold of Protestantism in thenorth of Ireland. As a defender in the siege , Captain James was pitted againsst the forces of James the II whowas making a move for restoration of the Catholic faith. There is a stained window in the Londonderry Cathedral which has his name. [notes from genealogist: Diana Granger]

 

       "One of the signers of the humble address of the govenor, officers, clergy and other gentlemen in the city and garrison of Londonderry to William and Mary of the date, July 29,1689; shortly after the famous siege of that noted stronghold of Protestantism, was James McCormick." [Pennsylvania Genealogies by Wm. Egle:]

 

       "McCormick Memories": 

       In 1689 the city withstood a 105 day siege by the army of James II. The event is commemorated every year.  Although Jamess opponents saw him as a tyrant acting as a tool of the expansionist Catholic Louis XIV of France, it was not tyranny but stupidity and cowardice that brought his downfall.  After fleeing to France in 1689, he assembledan Irish-French army in an attempt to restore himself, but in 1690 his army was defeated by William at the Battle of the BOYNE in Ireland.

Boyne near Drogheda, in Ireland, the deposed Roman Catholic King James III of England was defeated by the army of his Proatestant successor, William III.

 

       "One of the signers of an address to William III and Mary, dated July 29, 1689. Captain James McCormick is mentioned frequently in accounts of the seige of Londonderry in 1689 (see Fighters of Derry-Young). At this time, Derry, or Londonderry, was the chief stronghold of Protestantism in North Ireland. As a defender in the seige, Captain James was pitted against the forces of James II, who was making, then his final, futile move for restoration. The name of Captain James McCormick is inscribed on a stained glass window in Londonderry Cathedral. This memorial window, honoring the defenders, was unveiled in 1913, and among the subscribers are the following names: Cyrus Hall McCormick and Leander James McCormick." [Robert M. Williams]

 

       In the year 1688, when Catholic King James 11 was replaced on the English Throne by Protestants, William of Orange and Mary his wife, James was determined t o reign on the Throne, He came to Ireland and raised an Army of his fellow Cat holics. The City of Londonderry, was a Protestant stronghold. When the citizens learned that James 11 was on his way with an Army,

thirteen apprentice boys siezed the keys of the gate and slammed them firmly shut, in the face of Jamess troops. The siege began in ernest when James appeared at the gates in April 1689. Some 30,000 Protestants had taken refuge in the city, which was now swelled with people. They were short of food, and in what was a wet summer a lot of sickness. Dogs, cats, mice, candles, and leather were soon being ea ten. Thousands died of starvation and disease. James sent a mortar shell ove r the city, which contained not explosives, but a letter giving the citizens terms of surrender. "No Surrender" was the final answer which the citizens of Londonderry sent out, and it has been the watch word of Northern Protestants ever since. Mean while William of Orange (Crowned King of England, Ireland, and Scotland) was sending troops to Ireland with supplies for the city.  They finally prevailed against Jamess troops and the siege ended on June 28, 1689.  On July 29, 1689 the citizens of Londonderry following the siege of that city presented to William and Mary his wife and address (pledged to loyalty t o them) bearing the signatures of the well-known gentlemen and citizens of that City.  Among these names occurs that of James McCormick. (Father of our Emigrant Ancestor- Thomas McCormick)" The Fighters of Derry" pg. 165 Has this to say about James McCormick: " Capt. James McCormick (MacCormac), of Lisburn, d efender.  Held a commission as captain in Col. Arthur Uptons Co. Antrim Regim ent, serving with Sir Arthur Rawdons force down to the retirement on Derry.  During the siege he served in the same rankin Col. Michelburns Regiment.  He is frequently mentioned by siege annalists for distinguished service. Mackenz ie thus writes of him, describing events early in May, "few days passed but Capt. James McCormick with officers or some of them went out with small parties, and seldom returned without doing some execution on the enemy or bringing in some some small prey." His name is among the signatures to the address to King William after the relief.  He served with the Mitchelburn Regiment at the "B attle of the Boyne" and through the subsequent campaign. [Belinda McCormick]

 

 


Citations:
Notes:

        or WELCH,

       Children:

1.+Hugh McCORMICK,  b.6 May 1695 Cross, Derry, Londonderry, Ireland,

2.  James McCORMICK,  b.16 July 1697 Londonderry, Ireland, d.1718 Londonderry, Ireland, 

3.  Sarah McCORMICK,  b.3 Sep.1700 Londonderry, Ireland, d.bef.1794, 

4.+Thomas McCORMICK,  b.6 Aug.1702 Cross, Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland, d.1762 Cumberland Co. 

5.+John McCORMICK,  b.11 May 1703, d.18 Nov.1718, 

6.  Samuel McCORMICK,  b.1704,

7.+Benjamin McCORMICK,  b.1705 Cross, Londerry, Northern Ireland,

??8.+Mildred Jenet McCORMICK,  b.1700?? Londerry, Northern Ireland,

 

       [Ulster Historical Foundation, Waring Street, Belfast, BT1 2ED, Northern Ireland, UK] 


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